In Anticipation of Spring

For those looking forward to the days lengthening and the coming of spring. This poem was written by Paula Meehan.

SEED

The first warm day of spring
and I step out into the garden from the gloom
of a house where hope had died
to tally the storm damage, to seek what may
have survived. And finding some forgotten
lupins I’d sown from seed last autumn
holding in their fingers a raindrop each
like a peace offering, or a promise,
I am suddenly grateful and would
offer a prayer if I believed in God.
But not believing, I bless the power of seed,
its casual, useful persistence,
and bless the power of sun,
its conspiracy with the underground,
and thank my stars the winter’s ended.

 

Gladden the Heart

 

I remember when I was quite young I heard the expression “to gladden the heart”.  It was years before I actually understood what it meant.  The first time I read this poem I was reminded of that expression.  When I came across the poem again this morng  it lightened my spirit once more.

 

 

Smiling is infectious

You catch it like the flu

When someone smiled at me today

I started smiling too

 

I walked around a corner

And someone saw me grin

When he smiled I realised

I had passed it onto him

 

I thought about a smile

And realised its worth

A single smile like mine

Could travel round the earth

 

So if you feel a smile begin

Don’t leave it undetected

Start an epidemic and get the world infected.

Spike Milligan

Are you a poet?

In an article for www.writing.ie “Thoughts for Budding Poets” Liz Cowley says and I quote “…poetry shouldn’t be like medicine – hard to swallow but good for you”.    I totally agree.

Liz Cowley is one of my favourite poets Her work is so accessible.   She can make the most mundane seem important.   That together with the laughter which mingles with the often-tough topics of everyday living is what makes reading her poetry so enjoyable.

Liz Cowley opens the article “Thoughts for Budding Poets” by suggesting that many people are poets but are afraid that that we would be embarrassed by our ramblings/ scribblings.  That those scribblings would not be good enough.  Perhaps she is correct and that there is a poet in all of us just waiting to get out.

 

Why Put Off Things

 

Why delay? Why put them off –

the things we could have done before?

Why is it that we hesitate

and what is it we’re waiting for?

 

Why don’t we do things sooner?

Why do we often hesitate

until the day it’s much later,

it’s suddenly become too late?

 

Taken from the book “And Guess Who He Was With” by Liz Cowley

Reconnecting

Let me

Love you

Always.

Please do.

 

By Susan McMillan

 

 

I came across this poem this morning on  www.rhythminlife.net

Perhaps this resonated with me after attending a family wedding last Saturday. It was a privilege to witness such a special ceremony.

It was lovely to see people reconnecting.

Young cousins now adults catching up.

Aunts and uncles meeting nieces and nephews as adults and engaging with them as adults.

Having the pure joy of hearing grandnieces and a grandnephew laugh.

The reassurance of a loved one as we looked on.

These special moments are priceless.

Thank you Andrea and Paul.

Poetry

 

Pen paper and mugs are part of my life but words are an integral part. I enjoy reading poetry as opposed to studying and learning poetry as had to be done in school.

During those many sleepless nights I  have come across some wonderful websites all to do with poetry. I am just amazed how a poet can put a few words together and conjure up images that are as vivid as an artist’s painting. It is pure alchemy.

I came across a contemporary poet Eileen Carney Hulme. Her poetry seemed to just lift off the page. She was born in Scotland of Irish/ Scottish descent. Here is just one I would like to share with you. It is from her poem The Letters

 

I wonder if you keep

 the letters still,

spidery and blotted

now, like old days

I remember sunlight burst

that inspired

Those winged words