Resonating Image

 

 

Have you ever come across a saying or a quote which exactly sums up numerous thoughts which you have? Not only does it verbally say exactly what you want said but it immediately conjures up an image.

 

A few days ago, I “visited” Appletree Crafts via Facebook.  Appletree Crafts is a one stop shop for everything quilting.  A question was posed “What is the favourite part of your sewing routine?” among the many replies one just stood out for me………

” Learning new techniques feels like adding to my utility belt of skills.”

 

Wow what a brilliant image.  It really resonated with me.  I could so visualise the concept.  Learning a new skill is so exciting and mastering it is when I dance around the craft table.  What about dancing around with a utility belt…….

 

This sums up for me what crafting is all about.  Gathering new skills, learning new skills, enhancing established skills and adding them to this belt with pockets where one can dip into as the need arises

 

I have been playing around with the idea.  When it comes to fruition I will share but until then I hope this will suffice.

 

Abby, I hope you approve.

Traditions

 

Have you found Christmas Traditions have changed over the years?

 

If you have been fortunate like me to have become a parent then those traditions most certainly have changed.  A few years ago, I would have been sad about those changes but now at this stage I am glad that those changes have occurred.  It shows that life is being lived and for that I am very thankful.

 

However, there are still somethings which still herald Christmas.  Preparing and making the Christmas puddings, Christmas cake and the Christmas mincemeat are signals that Christmas is coming.  The first indication I have that Christmas is very near is when I post those first Christmas cards.  The next indication is when I arrive home with Christmas purchases.  These are small items which are either made or bought then wrapped and put under the Christmas tree for distributing among friends and family.

I met someone recently who told me that she detests January and February as the weather is usually awful, people are grumpy as they have little to look forward to and she has named them the BLAH months.  Last year she changed things and started making Christmas items which could be given to various friends and charities.  For her it extended the feeling of Christmas giving.  And in a very practical way it relieved the Christmas stress that she was normally under.  Next year as Easter is early, April 1st 2018, she intends to use her three least favourite months of the year to make Easter gifts.  A new tradition for her.

 

I like the idea of new traditions and I have to agree with her that very often people seems to be rather glum in January so perhaps extending the gift of giving to Easter is a good idea.  Those charities which we may support at Christmas I am sure need support during the rest of the year. Perhaps its a tradition which more of us could embrace?

 

A Christmas Card

I know this is going to be contentious but here it goes.  In Ireland over the last 10 years there has been a growing push by charities asking people to donate to a charity and not post or send Christmas Cards.  Why are they doing this?

There are many people and not just older people who look forward to getting Christmas cards in the post.   The card pops through the letter box usually with a Christmas postage stamp, the envelope hand written and inside there is a personal greeting.

Please pause a moment and thing back to the last time you received a personal greeting through the post? Let’s face it the occasion very rarely happens.  With the advent of paperless billing the volume of post has dropped.  Isn’t it good to receive that personal greeting?

Isn’t it wonderful to think that a friend, a colleague, a neighbour, a family member has taken the time to choose a card, write a greeting, address the envelope and then post it.  Isn’t it good to feel that even for a short time you were important to that person?

I attended a workshop during the year and a young lad asked me if I sent cards at Christmas. “Of course,” I replied “but why are you asking”? I learnt that this young lad has a chronic illness and at times it results in anxiety and depression.  When his energy is low and he feels his anxiety rising he will take out one of the Christmas cards he received and remind himself that he is important.

This conversation has remained with me.  We just never know how the simple gesture of sending a Christmas card can impact on someone.  I am sure there are many other examples of the smiles that a Christmas card can evoke.

Then there are the people who make their own Christmas cards who not only get a great buzz of making those cards but who also make others feel very important.  The hours which are spent choosing designs, paper and finally putting it all together before actually sitting down to write the personal greeting.

Many people send cards which they have purchased from specific charities knowing that the money is going back to that charity. These charities range from Children’s hospital to animal welfare. The money from those cards are important to those charities.

Can I ask a question of those charities who are asking people to donate rather than sending out Christmas cards? Why do you not ask people to consider donating the cost of an extra Christmas present? Why are charities not at Easter time asking people to stop buying Easter Eggs and instead donating the money to charity? There has grown the tradition of the 12 Pubs at Christmas in Ireland.  Why have the charities not targeted that?

These charities that ask us to donate instead of sending cards should really consider the impact this has on those who receive these Christmas cards.

 

Christmas puds

20 Minutes

Perhaps 20 minutes isn’t too long in the grand scheme of things.  Perhaps there isn’t much to be achieved in 20 minutes? Well let me tell you there is a hell of a lot which can be achieved in those precious 20 minutes.  A while ago I took part in a survey asking about using 20 minutes to volunteer.  It got me thinking.

What could be made in 20 minutes? What could it be used for? Could it really be termed volunteering? Twenty minutes with my slow crochet work will make a tiny premature baby hat.  Now there are others who crochet and who would make a premature baby jacket in 20 minutes. ( I am slow)  IMAG0791

 

 

Now before you switch off from this post just because you may not be a crafter can I make a suggestion here of how you might be able to volunteer 20 minutes.  Would you have 20 minutes to purchase yarn, fabric and donate it?  If you don’t know anyone directly who knits just contact your local ICA  or similar group they will definitely know.

IMAG0787

Crafting is expensive so two fat quarters of fabric would make a premmie blanket.  2 yards of fabric can be used to make a fidget quilt for a person with dementia.   Then there are the bravery blankies for children and teenagers in hospital with cancer.  2 balls of yarn would go along way to making so many things.

Please don’t think about it just head off and purchase that ball of yarn, or that piece of fabric and pass it on and put a smile on someone’s face.

A Punch

 

 

I can’t believe that the paper punch is over 100 years old.

I am sure if you use Google on a daily basis you have now realised that on 14th November 1886 it was patented by Frederich Soennecken.  This led to Benjamin Smith’s patent in and to the patent of Charles Brooke which not only punched a hole but also collected the paper which had been punched out.

I like punches: from the simple one-hole punch to decorative paper punches.   On my shelf I can see the one-hole punch, double hole which was used to hole foolscap paper.  I have one which can punch numerous holes for ring binders.  Great for keeping magazines in one place.

I can remember as a clerical worker a punch was an invaluable piece of equipment for storing correspondence in files.  However, if you had a punch which gathered the punched pieces of paper you were in heaven.  Those pesky bits of paper were in one place.

In later years, I have decorated jam jars or mason jars with those pesky bits of paper to give the effect of snow with a tea light candle glimmering inside.  All the time keeping a wary eye that the glass wasn’t getting too warm.  Those battery-operated tea lights have taken the worry out now.

Over the years I have seen beautiful handmade greeting cards which have used only punches to create wonderful designs.

Is a punch part of your life? Do you have more than one? Or is a punch obsolete?